1 October 2021

Birthpangs of the New Creation: Judgment unto Salvation in the Book of Revelation

In our culture, “apocalypse” typically refers to a cataclysmic, catastrophic ending, real or imagined. Often this meaning, in which fear eclipses hope, is traced back to the biblical tradition. But what if the book from which we derive the term, i.e. the “Apocalypse”—or “Revelation”—of John, refers less to the end of the world than to a transition between the two Ages? What if that transition is characterized as double-edged: as both “the death throes of the old world order” and “the birthpangs of the new creation”?  Attentive to the nature of apocalyptic discourse, which typically also features an “open heaven” (or reconnection between the heavens and the earth) motif, this course will seek to develop a key area of systematic theology by exploring the topics of death, judgment, heaven, and hell—the ‘four last things’ of traditional eschatology—as they are portrayed in the book of Revelation. 


In allowing intertextual and intratextual webs of meaning to emerge, we will pay special attention to the way in which Old Testament echoes, together with the book’s own symbolic coherence and narrative logic, can open up new avenues for exegesis, and for theological reflection.  The topic of Final Judgment will be a special focus. How is this to be conceived in the light of the apocalyptic transition? If the first reference to Babylon in the biblical canon, the Babel narrative of Gen 11, refers to a judgment that does not bring history to an end but opens it up once again to the dissemination motif of Gen 1:28, is it possible to detect a parallel “judgment unto salvation” theme in the final book of the New Testament? Our discussions will explore the interface between biblical studies, the “theological interpretation of Scripture,” and contemporary eschatology. Familiarity with New Testament Greek is an advantage but is not a prerequisite.



Dr. Nik Ansell
ICS 120404 / 220404 W22
ICT3736HS / ICT6736HS L0101*
Remote (Online Synchronous)
Wednesdays, 2pm - 5pm ET

(MWS, MA, PhD)


Syllabus


Enrolment Notes:
To register for this course, email academic-registrar@icscanada.edu. Last date to register January 14, 2022. Maximum enrolment of nine (9) students. ICS reserves the right to decline registrations.


*Attention TST students: you have to contact the ICS Registrar to complete your registration.

Deeper Learning: From Wonder to Inquiry to Practice

Deeper Learning is a course for instructional leaders. It explores learning as a journey from wonder to inquiry to practice. This course seeks to help Christian educators develop Deeper Learning within the context of:  

    1. A celebration of the learner - What does it mean to be created in God’s image? 

    2. A mindfulness towards learning design - How does curriculum, instruction and assessment inspire us to live out our lives as Kingdom Ambassadors who are intentional about character formation and loving our neighbours?  

    3. A responsiveness to culture - How do we embody our mission in every aspect of school life and live it out in God’s world?

Students will gain an understanding of global education and how it can inform one’s Deeper Learning pedagogy.

(Source: Deeper Learning in Christian Schools: Playing our Part in God’s Story; cace.org) 


Dr. Edith van der Boom
ICSD 260004 W22*
Blended (Online Asynchronous/Synchronous)

(MA-EL)


Syllabus


Enrolment Notes:
To register for this course, email academic-registrar@icscanada.edu. Last date to register January 14, 2022. Maximum enrolment of nine (9) students. ICS reserves the right to decline registrations.


*NOTE: Approved for Area 3 of the CSTC

Foundations and Implications of Phenomenology

This course will look at the philosophical foundations of, and contemporary issues in, phenomenology. We will explore key features of the phenomenological method—including the reduction, the bracketing of the ‘natural attitude,’ the first-person methodology, intentionality, and givenness. We will also look at how the current conversations on these questions have implications for fields as diverse as psychology, religious studies, sociology, music, and more.


Dr. Neal DeRoo
ICSD 223001 W22
Remote (Online Synchronous)
Tuesdays, 7pm - 10pm ET

(MA, PhD)


Syllabus


*NOTE: This course is only available to ICS Junior Members

How to Govern a School: Board Governance, Decision-Making, and Community-Engagement

How to Govern a School is a course for new and aspiring principals, school leadership teams, and school boards. The course provides frameworks and tools for leadership in educational governance. 

The course introduces participants to the work of nurturing the relationships among the school’s stakeholders, with a focus on the pivotal relationship between the board and the executive leadership team (or, in smaller schools, the principal). Different approaches to the work of the board are considered, with particular attention to the stewardship of the school’s vision, mission, and values, to the strategic formulation of policy and the monitoring of executive performance, and to accountability to the school’s parents and supporting community.


Dr. Gideon Strauss
ICS 260002 W22
Blended (Online Asynchronous/Synchronous)

(MA-EL)


Syllabus


Enrolment Notes:
To register for this course, email academic-registrar@icscanada.edu. Last date to register January 14, 2022. Maximum enrolment of nine (9) students. ICS reserves the right to decline registrations.

IDS: Colonization, Racial Identity, and what it Means to be Human

The Americas have yet to work through the damaging legacy of European colonization, and the deleterious consequences of the European colonizers’ attempt to dominate or eliminate the different cultural groups with whom they came into contact. This seminar will attempt to confront this legacy by listening to some of the voices that colonizers had sought to silence. In particular, we will consider the work of prominent Black, Indigenous, and Latin American thinkers as they engage Western thought on the question of what it means to be human. The scholarly exchange between these voices and the Western tradition has resulted in an interdisciplinary array of literature that documents the diverse ways in which racialized and marginalized thinkers seek to broaden the human definition beyond the narrow confines set by the assumption of White supremacy. We will listen to these developing philosophical anthropologies as they seek to integrate specific histories of domination and oppression with alternative conceptions of what it means to be human. In doing so, we will also pay particular attention to the role that religious discourses have and continue to play in both the establishment and criticism of White supremacy. This course will provide a survey into such literature, allowing students to dialogue with texts by racialized and minority voices, and empower them to reflect on the effects of European colonization, systemic racism, and white supremacy in the philosophical tradition in which they are apprentices.


Dr. Ron Kuipers
ICS 2400AC W22
Remote (Online Synchronous)
Thursdays, 10am - 1pm ET

(MA, PhD)


Syllabus


Enrolment Notes:
To register for this course, email academic-registrar@icscanada.edu. Last date to register January 14, 2022. Maximum enrolment of nine (9) students. ICS reserves the right to decline registrations.


*Attention TST students: if you are interested in taking this course for credit, you must petition your college of registration to count the course credit toward your degree program.

Individuality in the Franciscan Thought of John Duns Scotus and William of Ockham

This seminar will examine the doctrine of individuality developed by the Franciscan thinkers John Duns Scotus and William of Ockham and the configuration of their thought as one or another form of metaphysical “individualism.”  It does so historically against the backdrop of both Franciscan spirituality and the contested “Aristotelianism” of their university environment. The seminar is both an illustration of the value in and a critical reappraisal of a problem-historical analysis of philosophy that centres upon philosophical accounts of our daily experience of both universality in the world, i.e., the fact that creatures come to us in kinds, and individuality, i.e., the fact that it is individual creatures that come to us in kinds.


Dr. Bob Sweetman ICS 120404 / 220404 W22
ICH5151HS L0101* Remote (Online Synchronous) Thursdays, 2pm - 5pm ET (MWS, MA, PhD) Syllabus Enrolment Notes: To register for this course, email academic-registrar@icscanada.edu. Last date to register January 14, 2022. Maximum enrolment of nine (9) students. ICS reserves the right to decline registrations. *Attention TST students: you have to contact the ICS Registrar to complete your registration.

Recognition or Refusal? Cultural Politics in a Colonial Canada

Canada is often described as a democratic, “multicultural” nation whose political institutions are capable of recognizing a diversity of cultural identities, expressions, and practices. However, many Indigenous thinkers and activists argue that the politics of recognition that characterizes Canada’s engagement with Indigenous communities should be rejected or refused, owing to the Canadian state’s persistent colonialism in dictating the terms of dialogue, typically in culturally and economically assimilating ways. This Indigenous politics of refusal thus challenges both Canada’s open and accommodating self-image and the liberal notions of culture and cultural diversity that have shaped Canadian political thought. The first part of this course explores the philosophical underpinnings of the idea of recognition, alongside its application within Canadian political theory. It then assesses the adequacy of a liberal politics of recognition for addressing Indigenous-settler relationships in Canada. Our main guide will be Glen Sean Coulthard’s 2014 work Red Skin, White Masks: Rejecting the Colonial Politics of Recognition, which applies the work of anticolonial theorist Frantz Fanon to Canada’s interaction with Indigenous communities. Reading Coulthard’s work alongside other Indigenous authors, we will explore the challenge of pursuing non-colonial forms of recognition in relation to questions about freedom, rights, property, gender, and political discourse, and to the way that Indigenous authors and activists imagine alternative futures and practices of self-determination beyond the terms of Canadian nationalism.

Dr. Andrew Tebbutt ICS 153301 / 253301 W22 Remote (Online Synchronous) Mondays, 6pm - 9pm ET
(MWS, MA, PhD) Syllabus Enrolment Notes: To register for this course, email academic-registrar@icscanada.edu. Last date to register January 14, 2022. Maximum enrolment of nine (9) students. ICS reserves the right to decline registrations. *Attention TST students: if you are interested in taking this course for credit, you must petition your college of registration to count the course credit toward your degree program.

Religion, Life, and Society: Reformational Philosophy

An exploration of central issues in philosophy, as addressed by Herman Dooyeweerd, Dirk Vollenhoven, and the “Amsterdam School” of neoCalvinian thought. The course tests the relevance of this tradition for recent developments in Western philosophy. Special attention is given to critiques of foundationalism, metaphysics, and modernity within reformational philosophy and in other schools of thought.


Dr. Bob Sweetman
ICS 1107AC / 2107AC W22
ICT3702HS / ICT6702HS L0101*
Remote (Online Synchronous)
Tuesdays, 2pm - 5pm ET

(MWS, MA, PhD)


Syllabus


Enrolment Notes:
To register for this course, email academic-registrar@icscanada.edu. Last date to register January 14, 2022. Maximum enrolment of nine (9) students. ICS reserves the right to decline registrations.


*Attention TST students: you have to contact the ICS Registrar to complete your registration.

31 May 2021

The Radical Theopoetics of John D. Caputo

This seminar will explore John D. Caputo’s Theopoetics, a "weak theology" of narratives, prayers and praise in response to the call of God in contrast to a "strong" theology of predicative claims about the existence and nature of God. 


Dr. Jim Olthuis
ICS 150907 / 250907 F21
Remote (Online Synchronous)
Wednesdays, 2pm - 5pm EST

(MWS, MA, PhD)




Enrolment Notes:
To register for this course, email academic-registrar@icscanada.edu. Last date to register September 17, 2021. Maximum enrolment of nine (9) students. ICS reserves the right to decline registrations.


*Attention TST students: if you are interested in taking this course for credit, you must petition your college of registration to count the course credit toward your degree program.