17 September 2020

Facing the Darkness: The (Human) Nature of Evil

We shall discuss the origin and nature of evil by engaging various biblical, theological, and anthropological resources. Topics will include lament literature (e.g. Job), idolatry and the demonic, original sin and the correlation between victim and agent, and the relationship between justice and mercy. The course will consist of seminars in which participants will engage key readings relevant to the practice of interdisciplinary theology.

Dr. Nik Ansell
ICS 120801 / 220801 F20
ICT3352HF / ICT6352HF L0101*
Distance (Online Synchronous)
Thursdays, 2 - 5pm

(MA, PhD)

Syllabus


*Attention TST students: you have to contact the ICS Registrar to complete your registration. 

The Aesthetics of Compassion

The emotion of “pity” (eleos) or “compassion” is at the heart of Athenian tragedy, the great forbear of Western tragic drama. For Aristotle, creating feelings of pity and fear in an audience was thought to provoke a catharsis of those emotions that enabled a positive moderation of our passionate natures. But, as George Steiner has observed, the subject matter of tragedy places those emotions in a register beyond the ordinary. As fundamental human responses to extraordinary human suffering, they signal the “core of dynamic negativity” that underwrites authentic tragedy. Raising the problem of human pain and fragility in the face of circumstances potentially beyond human control, representations of human suffering have a metaphysical and, more particularly, theological dimension that has long provoked philosophical interest in the dynamics of tragic drama. In this course, we will examine the interface between philosophy and works of tragic drama as that interface pertains to the psychology and aesthetics of compassion. Looking to such writers as Plato, Aristotle, Seneca, Augustine, Dante, Shakespeare, Dostoevsky, Friedrich Nietzsche and Simone Weil, we will investigate the place of compassion in Western philosophy and theology and the roles that art and imagination have played in the stimulation of compassionate response. 


Dr. Rebekah Smick
ICS 120104 / 220104 F20
ICH5751HF L0101*
Distance (Online Synchronous)
Thursdays, 10am - 1pm

(MWS, MA, PhD)

Syllabus


*Attention TST students: you have to contact the ICS Registrar to complete your registration. 

16 September 2020

Hermeneutics and Deconstruction

Against the background of Heidegger's Being and Time, this seminar will contrast Gadamerian "Hermeneutics" and   Derridean "Deconstruction." Attention will then focus on Derridean John D. Caputo's 2019 Cross and Cosmos as an exercise in reading-with as rabbi/poet.

Dr. Jim Olthuis
ICS 120901 / 220901 F20
Distance (Online Synchronous)
Wednesdays, 10am - 1pm

(MA, PhD)

Syllabus


*Attention TST students: if you are interested in taking this course for credit, you must petition your college of registration to count the course credit toward your degree program.

15 September 2020

Nietzsche, Foucault, and the Genealogical Approach to the History of Philosophy

This seminar examines that philosophical approach to the history of philosophy that travels under the name of “genealogy”.  It does so in terms of selected texts of the tradition’s to major figures: its founder, Friederich Nietzsche and the presently ubiquitous Michel Foucault.  It examines the role that genealogical study of the history of philosophy has in the philosophical construction of its practitioners and what they think is truly first and deepest in the history they so study.

Dr. Bob Sweetman
ICS 120406 / 220406 F20
ICH5710HF L0101*
Distance (Online Synchronous)
Tuesdays, 10am - 1pm

(MA, PhD)

Syllabus


*Attention TST students: you have to contact the ICS Registrar to complete your registration. 

14 September 2020

Biblical Foundations

This course will explore the Bible as the ongoing story of and for God and creation, paying special attention to the way in which God's story is intertwined with that of humanity and the world. In asking whether and in what way the Bible is also our story, we will attempt to identify which hermeneutical methods might help us discern its significance for present day life, including the academic enterprise.

Dr. Nik Ansell
ICS 1108AC / 2108AC F20
ICB2010HF L0101*
Distance (Online Synchronous)
Mondays, 8 - 11pm

(MWS, MA, PhD)

Syllabus


*Attention TST students: you have to contact the ICS Registrar to complete your registration. 

The Observant Participant: Applying Research Craft to Professional Practice

TBA

ICSDH 132501 / 232501 F20
Dr. Gideon Strauss
Hybrid (Online Asynchronous/Synchronous)

(MA-EL, MWS)

Syllabus